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TOPIC: HELP! Thyroid problems and weight loss.

 
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July 29, 2013 12:14 PM
Hey, I'm just wondering if there is anyone that has hypothyroidism that is being treated and hasn't been struggling a lot with losing weight? Any success stories out there or inspiration/motivation? I feel like I'm never going back to the way I used to be. I'm only 27!

I was recently diagnosed with mild hypothyrodism and I'm on animal dessicated thyroid meds. Ive been struggling with thyroid issues for about 2 years and gained about 40 lbs. I've never had issues with losing weight, it's always been really easy for me but right now it seems almost impossible. My weight fluctuates like crazy so it's hard to tell what's genuine weight loss and what is just typical weight fluctuations. I started working out 5 days a week, 1800 calories, and drinking almost a gallon of water per day. Initially I lost about 6-8 pounds in the first 2 weeks, but now I'm starting to worry that it was just my water weight fluctuating like usual because I can't seem to lose any more weight. I don't know if I should reevaluate my calorie intake and drop it down a notch to maybe 1500, or if I should just continue doing what I'm doing and hope for results soon.

any advice? anyone going through something similar? I feel very unmotivated, disappointed, and frustrated.
  42948036
July 29, 2013 12:20 PM
I would suggest that you run, not walk, to a reputable endocrinologist in your area. Losing weight when you have a medical condition working against you is tricky. It's even worse when it's thyroid because your thyroid largely regulates your metabolic rate. Your endocrinologist should be able to help you stabilize your metabolism so that you can lose weight. I have a coworker who is currently going through the whole thyroid thing.

Questions I'd suggest you ask, if your doctor hasn't already checked for these:

1 - Have you been tested for Vitamin D deficiency?
2 - Have you been tested for iodine deficiency?
3 - Has celiac disease been ruled out?

Good luck!
  47789999
July 29, 2013 12:24 PM
I agree to see your doctor... if you're not losing weight anymore, your meds are probably wrong.

I think you might need to drop your calories (as much as that sucks)... I think I have a thyroid issue (going to see a doctor soon) and I find I don't lose anything until I'm at like 1200 calories. Try cutting 100-200 a week until you start to see progress again, but more importantly, see your doctor because I'm certainly not one!
  12709066
July 29, 2013 12:26 PM
I certainly wouldn't instantly recommend dropping your calories.

Here's a thought:

Don't work out for a few weeks. Just measure your food. Figure out how much you can eat to lose weight first. If you're working out a ton, you could be retaining water.. not getting accurate measure of calories burned, etc.

Give it 4...5...6 weeks. Just eat. Log everything. If you're losing, then you're doing it right. Then add back workouts. You'll already know how much you need to eat in order to lose.
  17170557
July 29, 2013 12:31 PM
I am with you and feeling frustrated. I have thyroid problems in my family and think that may be happening with me. My weight loss stopped and despite tons of exercise and low calorie intake I cannot seem to lose anymore. And I have only been eating 1300 calories. It is so frustrating! But my grandmother lived her whole life with hypothyroidism and was not overweight, so there is hope. You may want to contact your doctor to see if your dose is right. It can take a while to get it right. I would be content not to gain weight until it gets right, and then you will not be fighting an uphill battle. Good luck!
July 29, 2013 12:35 PM
There are tons of people here on MFP with thyroid issues. I am one of them. I lost weight by working out and wathcing what I ate. 40 lbs after the initial diagnosis (and getting my meds straight). I gained back about 20 after I stopped working out. I've since lost that and more by coming to MFP. There is a group here:
http://www.myfitnesspal.com/groups/home/753-hypothyroidism-and-hyperthyroidism
Check it out. Also, do a search within the forum with the same questions you asked. They've been asked many times before.

The bottom line is that yes, you can lose weight with an underactive thyroid. The same things that work for some don't work for all. For me, I take an "everything in moderation" approach, trying to make BETTER choices with my food more often than not. Others have found that they needed to eat on a more low-glycemic index type diet. Still others say that going gluten free worked for them.

Also, for me, in case you didn't notice it in what I said above, I have to work out. I will always have to work out unless I want to eat far less food or gain weight. I can go down to three 30 minute workouts per week, but I have to do at least that to stay in maintenance. That's what worked for ME, though. I'm on Synthroid, not the animal type thyroid meds, though I've thought about seeing if my doctor would switch me. Synthroid actually seems to be keeping me regulated, so I'm not sure I want to mess with it right now, though.
Edited by mariposa224 On July 29, 2013 12:46 PM
  15695080
July 29, 2013 12:40 PM
If you're not losing weight while hypo and eating correctly/exercising its because your meds aren't optimal more than likely. I am hypo due to having a full thyroidectomy and regardless of how I ate, or how much I worked out I wasn't able to lose any weight whatsoever. I had to get my meds optimized, iron/Vit D/VitB up as I was deficient, and also work on addressing my adrenal fatigue caused by being sick for so long as well.

Everything is perfect now with the exception of my adrenals (they're a lot better than what they were) and I'm finally feeling like a human again, and am losing weight while eating correctly and exercising.

So it can be done! :D Just make sure you have a doctor who REALLY understands thyroid disease - most endos will only treat by the TSH test alone, and since that's only one side of the picture, the majority of the time it will leave the patient symptomatic.

P.S. I've lost 17 pounds since March.
Edited by MmmDrop On July 29, 2013 12:42 PM
  15599707
July 29, 2013 12:42 PM
I agree with trogalicious... I don't think decreasing your calories dramatically will change anything but mess your metabolism.

I was diagnosed with Hashimoto's about 10 years ago. Since then I've been on meds and struggling with my weight. BUT, I'm struggling because I was eating excessively and not working out at all. I've been chubby most of my life and really heavy the last 15 years. My fault though, not the thryroid's.

With the help of my pill, I've been keeping my thyroid in good function (as much as it can be called good). No more awful symptoms.

I joined MFP in January this year and by eating much much better than I used to and working out every day, I have managed to lose almost 50 pounds (22kg). I have never felt like starving or suffering. It was diffuclt and tiring some times but noone said it would be easy anyway. I still eat chocolate and bacon and pizza... just not every day.

Maybe losing weight is a little more difficult for people with thyroid problems, but it's certainly not impossible. If I did it, almost anyone can, trust me... I think I must have been the most lazy and gluttonous person ever!

Have a talk with your endocrinologist and listen to your body. Hormones are tricky little things for most healthy people, imagine how they can be for someone suffering from a thyroid disorder. Maybe you need to readjust your dosage and maybe, you need to give yourself some time... some more time to figure out your eating habits and patterns, your exercise ones as well.

Do not despair! It's not impossible and you can do it! flowerforyou
  35501352
July 29, 2013 12:44 PM
I will send you a private message...
  136054

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