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TOPIC: So... Fruit will make me FAT?

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June 26, 2013 8:39 AM
I was told yesterday that eating fruit will make me fat. This really surprised me. I don't know if I am just uneducated about the subject or simply new at this.

I was told that eating fruit, which has a high amount of carbohydrates and sugar in it will cause the body to store it as fat if that energy is not used up - indeed making me the big F word (fat).

Please someone explain this to me. I am ALWAYS over on my sugar because I really do eat a lot of fruit. It keeps me full, its delicious and I thought it was healthy! I would hate to have to cut it out but it seems that if I have one piece of fruit, like an apple, I am automatically way over my sugar.

I really do not want to sound stupid. Of course I know that fruit won't automatically make me obese. I just want to know that if I am way over my sugar from all the fruits, is that going to slow my weight loss in the long run.
Edited by getting_fit86 On June 26, 2013 8:53 AM
June 26, 2013 8:39 AM
That's ridiculous.
  21333934
June 26, 2013 8:40 AM
If you eat too much of anything it can affect weight gain.
  29487459
June 26, 2013 8:43 AM
1) Sugar counts on this database are not always correct

2) Eat your fruit stay within your caloires and you won't get fat.

3) A lot of people really overcomplicate the process, eat at a deficit and you will lose weight, not really fast and not linearly but you will lose weight
June 26, 2013 8:43 AM
i love fruit but i always include the cals into my daily cal count as sum fruits have more than you would think
  28988002
June 26, 2013 8:43 AM
Prolonged caloric surpluses cause fat accumulation. Fruit, within a hypocaloric diet, does not.

So if you're eating a caloric surplus and getting fatter, it's the diet in its entirety causing the fat gain rather than some evil singular food item. I would stop listening to your carbophobic friend.
June 26, 2013 8:44 AM
QUOTE:

Prolonged caloric surpluses cause fat accumulation. Fruit, within a hypocaloric diet, does not.

So if you're eating a caloric surplus and getting fatter, it's the diet in its entirety causing the fat gain rather than some evil singular food item. I would stop listening to your carbophobic friend.


Listen to the man with the pretty abs. He knows what he's talking about.
  16691827
June 26, 2013 8:46 AM
Yes...everyone knows that too many apples and bananas are what has lead to the obesity epidemic...never mind the 32 Oz big gulp.

/sarcasm

Here's the thing...weight loss, maintenance, and weight gain is all science...namely, the laws of thermodynamics. Calories are energy...if you burn more energy (calories) than you consume, you lose weight. If you burn the same as you consume, you maintain...if you consume more than your body can burn, you gain. It has nothing to do with sugar or carbs or fat or any of that ****, the one caveat being medical conditions like diabetes or PCOS, etc...but barring that, it doesn't matter.

Fruit is extremely good for the body and anyone telling you otherwise is full of ****.
Edited by cwolfman13 On June 26, 2013 8:47 AM
June 26, 2013 8:48 AM
Excess calories will make you fat. Fruit can be very calorically dense. Other wise no, not one food will make you fat.
  7584267
June 26, 2013 8:49 AM
QUOTE:

I was told yesterday that eating fruit will make me fat. This really surprised me. I don't know if I am just uneducated about the subject or simply new at this.

I was told that eating fruit, which has a high amount of carbohydrates and sugar in it will cause the body to store it as fat if that energy is not used up - indeed making me the big F word (fat).

Please someone explain this to me. I am ALWAYS over on my sugar because I really do eat a lot of fruit. It keeps me full, its delicious and I thought it was healthy! I would hate to have to cut it out but it seems that if I have one piece of fruit, like an apple, I am automatically way over my sugar.

HELP


Eating fat would make you fatter
June 26, 2013 8:50 AM
yes, if you eat so much fruit that you go soaring up over your calorie goal you will gain wieght, because fruit is the debil . . . actually that will happen with any food in excess . . . maybe all foodz is the debil.
June 26, 2013 8:51 AM
Yes. But only if you eat this many fruit:

Image not displayed
June 26, 2013 8:51 AM
Image not displayed
June 26, 2013 8:52 AM
QUOTE:

QUOTE:

I was told yesterday that eating fruit will make me fat. This really surprised me. I don't know if I am just uneducated about the subject or simply new at this.

I was told that eating fruit, which has a high amount of carbohydrates and sugar in it will cause the body to store it as fat if that energy is not used up - indeed making me the big F word (fat).

Please someone explain this to me. I am ALWAYS over on my sugar because I really do eat a lot of fruit. It keeps me full, its delicious and I thought it was healthy! I would hate to have to cut it out but it seems that if I have one piece of fruit, like an apple, I am automatically way over my sugar.

HELP


Eating fat would make you fatter


that would just make me irregular.
June 26, 2013 8:53 AM
Take in more calories than your TDEE and you will gain weight. It doesn't matter whether that's fruit, vegetables, cake, chips or anything else.
June 26, 2013 8:54 AM
Anything will make you fat if you don't use up the energy. Fortunately, your body is using energy around the clock.

As long as you're in a caloric deficit, the fruit won't hurt you.

I don't track sugar.
June 26, 2013 8:55 AM
I find that a few pieces of fruit will put me way over on the sugars, but I am keeping within my calories and I am slowly losing weight. I even do an occasional fruit day, as a purge (once every couple of weeks) I wouldn't worry about it, if you are eating a balanced diet, and sticking to your calories, you will be fine.
June 26, 2013 8:56 AM
Yes, anything can make you fat if you eat too much of it. Fruit, however, is a complicated issue.

The sugar is fruit is fructose which can only be processed in the liver whereas most other sugars can be processed by other organs as well. Too much fructose results in excess adipose tissue production and fatty liver disease. More of fructose goes directly to fat than other sugars.

On the other hand, fruits are high in vitamins and minerals. Whole fruits are high in fiber. Eating limited servings of complete fruit per day is "good for you" in balance. Drinking filtered fruit juice removes the fiber and thus is more of a hit to the liver. Too much fructose can also interrrupt communication to the brain that controls hunger. More sugar indeed makes you hungrier for more sugar.

For more information on this, watch "The Skinny on Obesity," a series of short videos from University of California Television (http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL39F782316B425249) and also the university guest lecture "Sugar: The Bitter Truth" at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

And, no, no matter what the corn industry says, not all sugars are the same.
  39776585
June 26, 2013 8:56 AM
QUOTE:

Prolonged caloric surpluses cause fat accumulation. Fruit, within a hypocaloric diet, does not.

So if you're eating a caloric surplus and getting fatter, it's the diet in its entirety causing the fat gain rather than some evil singular food item. I would stop listening to your carbophobic friend.


I agree with him ^
I eat a LOT of fruit, especially bananas. And grapes. And pineapples. And apples. wink
  5139654
June 26, 2013 8:57 AM
Eat 35000 cals worth of fruit + another 35000 cals worth of fruit!
June 26, 2013 8:58 AM
So here's the thing. The statement, "Eating fruit will make me fat," is too vague.

If you're eating 5,000 calories worth of fruit each day and are not consuming enough protein or fats to complement the rest of your diet you're going to be unhealthy (weight aside for a moment). You need to find a happy medium. Currently the recommendations for fruit intake leave more than enough room to have a couple of pieces of fruit each and every day without being seriously concerned about weight gain.

Unless you have a dietary condition that makes your body handle sugar in an odd way having a moderate intake of fruit, with a simultaneously balanced diet, will not make you gain weight.
  3869322
June 26, 2013 8:58 AM
QUOTE:

Yes, anything can make you fat if you eat too much of it. Fruit, however, is a complicated issue.

The sugar is fruit is fructose which can only be processed in the liver whereas most other sugars can be processed by other organs as well. Too much fructose results in excess adipose tissue production and fatty liver disease. More of fructose goes directly to fat than other sugars.

On the other hand, fruits are high in vitamins and minerals. Whole fruits are high in fiber. Eating limited servings of complete fruit per day is "good for you" in balance. Drinking filtered fruit juice removes the fiber and thus is more of a hit to the liver. Too much fructose can also interrrupt communication to the brain that controls hunger. More sugar indeed makes you hungrier for more sugar.

For more information on this, watch "The Skinny on Obesity," a series of short videos from University of California Television (http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL39F782316B425249) and also the university guest lecture "Sugar: The Bitter Truth" at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

And, no, no matter what the corn industry says, not all sugars are the same.


Dr LOLstig?
June 26, 2013 8:58 AM
Yes, It's the fruit. It has always been the fruit.
June 26, 2013 9:00 AM
Yes, eating fruit 'could' make you fat. But you would have to eat an incredible amount of it to do so. One important thing to keep in mind is what KIND of sugar you are intaking. If it is natural sugar from fruit then your body will process it much more easily than if it is the modified crap sugar because our bodies are designed to process real sugar, not the crappy modern sugar.

Of course the math makes it simple, if you intake more calories than you burn the end result will be that you gain weight.
June 26, 2013 9:00 AM
QUOTE:

Yes, anything can make you fat if you eat too much of it. Fruit, however, is a complicated issue.

The sugar is fruit is fructose which can only be processed in the liver whereas most other sugars can be processed by other organs as well. Too much fructose results in excess adipose tissue production and fatty liver disease. More of fructose goes directly to fat than other sugars.

On the other hand, fruits are high in vitamins and minerals. Whole fruits are high in fiber. Eating limited servings of complete fruit per day is "good for you" in balance. Drinking filtered fruit juice removes the fiber and thus is more of a hit to the liver. Too much fructose can also interrrupt communication to the brain that controls hunger. More sugar indeed makes you hungrier for more sugar.

For more information on this, watch "The Skinny on Obesity," a series of short videos from University of California Television (http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL39F782316B425249) and also the university guest lecture "Sugar: The Bitter Truth" at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

And, no, no matter what the corn industry says, not all sugars are the same.


If you are eating at a caloric deficit, it doesn't matter at all how the sugar is processed, or even if the sugar will be stored as fat, because in a caloric deficit, that stored fat will be burned off later in the day. For example, if all I ate for the entire day was granulated sugar, but I only ate 2000 calories of granulated sugar for the day(2500 TDEE), then at the end of the day, I will have a net fat loss. Moral of the story, don't freak out about people over complicating things, if you eat in a caloric deficit and hit your protein and fat minimums, IT DOES NOT MATTER!
Edited by AJ_G On June 26, 2013 9:00 AM
  25793266

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